HazelThere are 8 products.

Hazel
Hazel (Corylus avellana)

There are a number of other different species that hazels nut are produced from, namely American Hazel (Corylus americana), Turkish Hazel (Corylus colurna), Filbert (Corylus maxima) and Chinese Hazel (Corylus chinensis).

A deciduous tree growing to 6 m (19ft) by 3 m (9ft) at a medium rate. The Turkish Hazel is more of a tree growing to 20m x 7m.
It is hardy to zone 4 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from Jan to April, and the seeds ripen from Sept to October. The flowers are monoecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but both sexes can be found on the same plant) and are pollinated by Wind. The plant is self-fertile.
It is noted for attracting wildlife.

The kernels can be eaten raw or roasted. An excellent nut for raw eating. The seed ripens in mid to late autumn and will probably need to be protected from squirrels. When kept in a cool place, and not shelled, the seed should store for at least 12 months.

An easily grown plant, it succeeds in most soils, but is in general more productive of seeds when grown on soils of moderate fertility. It does less well in rich heavy soils or poor ones. Does well in a loamy soil. Very suitable for an alkaline soil, succeeds in a pH range 4.5 to 8.5, but prefers a range of 5 to 7. Plants are fairly wind tolerant. A very hardy plant, succeeding in all areas of Britain. The flowers, however, are produced in late winter and early spring and can be damaged by heavy frosts at this time. A parent, together with C. maxima, of many cultivated forms of filberts and cob nuts. There are many named varieties. Plants are self-fertile but a more certain crop is obtained if more than one cultivar is grown. The main difference between cob nuts and filberts is that the husk of a filbert is longer than the seed and often completely encloses it, whilst the husk on a cob nut is shorter than the seed. Squirrels are a major pest of this plant, often decimating the crop of nuts.

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